Dear MendMeShop,

I am a 44 year-old woman in good health. I eat a fresh diet and take high-quality supplements, including MSM, glucosamine, Zyflamend, and all the usual joint-recomended supplements. I injured both knees two years ago while kneeling to tile my family room and entry. Subsequently, a simple twisting squat ripped my left meniscus with a huge bucket tear that required surgery to trim so it wouldn't keep catching and re-tearing. I am not one to undergo surgery unless it is unavoidable, and even after a "simple" scope operation, it took me a full year to get full extension back on that knee, and I doubt I will ever be able to squat again. I run a cleaning business. A couple of months ago an employee had forgotten to return equipment to my van, and I had to mop some hardwood flooring for a client on my hands and knees. That simple ten-minute job put me back out of commission. The kneeling pre-injured the area, and when I stepped back onto my good leg two days later, I felt that familiar burn of a fresh meniscus tear. I was heartsick, dreading another surgery and the attendant expense, pain, and down time. I know from my previous experience that cartilage is hard to heal because of the poor blood supply, especially to the center. I knew it was just a matter of time before I tore it further. (My dad had multiple knee scopes before finally getting a replacement, but I was not going down that path if I could help it!) I got online and researched alternatives that would get me back on my feet. Delighted to discover Mend Me Shop and their professional athletic healing devices, I ordered the Inferno Wrap and Ice Wrap. $400 would be a pittance relative to the $13,000 it costs to repair a torn meniscus (and that doesn't include rehab and lost income). During the week it took the package to arrive, I stayed off my feet as much as possible and iced the injured knee several times a day. My big hope was simply to avoid tearing the cartilage further before the stuff came. (With my surgery knee, I had re-torn it repeatedly before surgery.) The minute that I put that Inferno wrap around my bad knee, I was in love! The penetrating warmth felt amazing. I kept it by my desk and strapped it on when I would sit and work at the computer. And I kept icing the knee. Within a couple weeks I was walking evenly on both legs, if gingerly lest I inadvertently twist or bounce. But I was definitely healing. I didn't miss any work after the first week, though I moved more slowly than usual and occasionally felt that piercing reminder of the tear. I had to lie down and elevate my knee every two hours to get through the day, but it was slowly healing. Four weeks later I was feeling so good, and the day was so sunny, that I went skipping off the front porch and was reminded I have a torn meniscus! And so it goes to this day, some six weeks later: the injury is there, but it is gradually improving. The more I use the therapy devices, the faster it improves. The more I get lazy and feel perfect and neglect them, the more I slow down. But I work a full schedule without breaks and only occasionally am reminded of the injury. By God's grace and with many thanks to Mend Me Shop, I have avoided surgery! Gratefully yours, Debbie Morgan

Rating: Five Star Rating

Debbie Morgan

 

Anatomy

The upper leg muscles provide your knees with mobility (extension, flexion and rotation) and strength. The hamstring muscles are located on the back of your thigh. They work closely with your quadriceps muscles (front of your thigh), your gluteal muscles, and your calf muscles to ensure proper movement of your leg and hip.

Leg anatomy and the hamstring

Your hamstring muscles control movement of your body, hip and knee, help turn your leg in and out, and are involved with power activities that include a lot of propulsion, thrust and control (such as jumping, running, and walking). They are involved with eccentric movements, which increase the length of the muscle while it is under tension - instead of starting an action, the muscles act as a brake to stop an action. You can feel this when walking or running downhill, landing from jumps or performing squats, and when trying to stop quickly after sprinting.

The hamstrings (posterior thigh muscles) are made up of 3 long muscles that start at the bottom of your pelvis extending down the back of your thigh and along either side of your knee, to your shin bones. The lateral hamstring is the biceps femoris (made up of 2 parts - a short head and long head) and the medial hamstrings are the semitendinosus (joins the sartorius muscle and gracilis muscle at the pes anserinus on the tibia) and the semimembranosus (the largest hamstring muscle). The tendons (tough fibers that connect muscle to bone) for these muscles begin at your ischial tuberosity (the bony bump under each buttock, known as your "sit bone") and attach on the outer edges of your shinbone (your tibia and fibula) just below the back of your knee. They help to stabilize your knee. Your hamstrings also have a lot of soft connective tissues and are innervated by your sciatic nerve.



Hamstrings Pulls

Your hamstrings are very long muscles that cross 2 joints (your hip and knee) therefore they are more prone to injury. Hamstrings pulls (also called strained hamstrings) are one of the most common injuries in vigorous sports activities; 33% of lower body injuries for those between 16-25 years of age are hamstring injuries.

Overstretching in sports can cause injuries

These occur when one or more hamstring muscles are stretched beyond their limit or are in a vulnerable position, and the muscle tissues become strained or torn. The biceps femoris muscle is the most frequently injured, as it suffers the largest stretch during sprinting, followed by the semitendinosus muscle. If you have a multi-muscle injury, it normally occurs at the point where your hamstring muscles and tendons meet (musculotendinous junction). However, they can also occur at any place along your hamstring muscle bellies, or at the tendon attachments to the bone.

Acute strains are caused by direct hit, fall or overloading, whereas chronic pulls are generally caused by overuse or prior unhealed injuries. The damage can range from overstretching to partial tearing to complete rupturing of the small fibers that make up your hamstring muscles.

Most commom pulled hamstring injuries

These injuries occur most often early in the activity as a result of a poor warm up, or in the later stages of practices or games as a result of fatigue. Young, active teens or adults between 25-44 years are most susceptible to pulled hamstrings, and men are twice as likely to be injured as women.

Other common hamstring injuries involve hamstring contusions (bruising or hemorrhaging beneath unbroken skin), hamstring tendonitis or tendinopathy, or avulsion fractures (a severely pulled hamstring will tear a piece of bone with it). This generally occurs where the hamstring tendon attaches to the ischial tuberosity.

Lower back pain cause by weak hamstring muscles.

Weak hamstring muscles also play a role in knee or low back injuries (cause your pelvis to tilt). If you allow hamstring injuries to persist they can lead to repeated injury, periostitis (inflammation of the periosteum), and prolonged disability. They are often confused with sciatic neuritis.

Alternate names and/or associated conditions:

Hamstring pull, hamstring strain, strained hamstring, hamstring tendonitis, hamstring tendinopathy, hamstring syndrome, avulsion injury, posterior femoral muscle strain, hamstring tear, periostitis, hamstring muscle contusion, bursitis of semimembranosus or ishio-gluteal, chronic compartment syndrome of posterior thigh, hamstring scar tissue, sciatic neuritis, Myositis Ossificans

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Dear MendMeShop,

I came across the MendMeShop while searching online for remedies for Plantar Faciitis. The Inferno Wrap that I purchased has been well worth the price. First it fits very well and is easy to put on and take off and it puts out the right amount of heat with its adjustable temperatures. Also I found this firm very easy to work with as I did have some product questions and they were very responsive. I would recommend them to anyone.

Rating: Five Star Rating

Dennis Ensor

 

pain relief and injury treatment with ultrasound therapy

This universal leg wrap can increase healing rate of a shin, calf, groin, thigh, or hamstring

Freezie Leg wrap for cold compression of the shin, calf, groin, thigh, or hamstring

Inferno Wrap Elbow for tennis elbow, epicondylitis, elbow strains and elbow sprain

Freezie Wrap Elbow for tennis elbow, epicondylitis, and elbow sprain to prevent surgery

Blood Flow Stimulation Therapy with an Inferno Back wrap for the ultimate in sore back healing

Freeze Wrap Back - reduce back pain and swelling in sore, strained or overused muscles, especially in the lower back and trapezius muscles

Inferno Wrap Shoulder - an advanced treatment for shoulder injury and rotator cuff injury

Freezie Wrap Shoulder - efficient relief of swelling and pain from an active sprain, shoulder strain, whiplash, or tight upper back muscles

Contact one of our Mendmeshop Customer Service Advisors for any questions help with ordering and recommended treatment directions